Research papers

Gender equality is the result of a number of complex issues. The Agency produces insight papers that draw on both the data and academic research to investigate both the causes and impacts of gender inequality. The evidence-based papers listed below offer deeper insights into topics such as negotiation in the workplace, parental leave, women's economic security in retirement, unpaid care work, mentoring and sponsorship and targets and quotas.

Australia's gender equality scorecard is a report released each year by the Agency. The report showcases a sample of the key findings from that year's reporting period and includes information on gender segregation, gender pay gaps, women in leadership and much more.

Gender equitable procurement and supply chain strategies involve organisational procurement of goods and services, which are designed to improve gender equality objectives in either the procuring organisation or the supplying organisation.

In partnership with the Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), the Agency uncovers new insights about gender pay gaps in Australian workplaces. Every year since 2016, BCEC has produced a report analysing the Agency’s datasets to explore trends and identify policies and practices that work to address gender inequality in the workplace.

The intersection of gender and technology highlights workplace inequities. The under-representation of women in the education, jobs, and sectors that produce technology influences technology design and function. 

Health crises can exacerbate existing gender inequalities. As the global health pandemic caused by COVID-19 is ongoing, the impacts and effects are still being assessed and understood. However, preliminary research and emerging data show that women are likely to be affected in particular ways by this global pandemic.

Women face greater risk of economic insecurity in retirement than men. To be economically secure in retirement means to be financially secure through a steady income and/or other resources to support a decent standard of living in the foreseeable future.

This report, commissioned by the WGEA and written by Dr Terry Fitzsimmons and a team of researchers from the AIBE Centre for Gender Equality in the Workplace, tracks EOCGE organisations over time to pinpoint commonalities in their approach to workplace gender equality and identify what leading practice looks like.

KPMG has developed this report, She’s Price(d)less: The economics of the gender pay gap, for Diversity Council Australia and the Workplace Gender Equality Agency. The report uses structured econometric modelling to determine the factors that underpin the gap, and to what extent they contribute to the issue.

Gender bias is pervasive at work and in organisations, creating inequalities at every stage of the employment cycle. This insight paper highlights some of the research examining how gender bias operates at work and provides evidence-based suggestions for creating more equitable recruitment and promotion systems.

This paper gives an overview of countries that have gender equality reporting schemes as well as information about a number of different models that are currently in use throughout the world.