2.7 How do I trace reporting levels to the CEO?

Once you have categorised your managers, you must also identify their reporting level to the CEO. 

Reporting levels to the CEO reflect the number of reporting levels between the CEO and the manager. For example, the manager who reports to the CEO has a reporting level of -1. These usually reflect an employer’s organisational chart. Keep in mind that employees in the same management category can have different reporting levels.

You do not have to do this for non-managers—reporting levels for non-manager categories should be entered as ‘NA’.

For a corporate structure, decide each manager’s level based on the organisation where they work, not the structure as a whole.

Reporting levels to the CEO

Level

Details

0

This is the CEO.

-1 to -15

Subtract one for each level below the CEO. A manager who reports directly to the CEO is -1, regardless of whether that CEO is overseas.

+1

If a manager is more senior than the CEO, and reports to someone overseas, they have a +1 reporting level above the CEO. This can sometimes happen in global organisations.

 Download our guide for entity level reporting for corporate structures and requirements for combined reports below for more information.

    Examples of reporting structures

    Example 1: Flat Organisational Structure

    This example shows a flat organisation where there are no managers who meet the definition of KMP or Other executives and general managers.

    2.7 drawing 1 (yellow)

    Key:

    • Bold black text: WGEA-defined manager category
    • Red numbers: reporting level to the CEO

    The employer’s aggregated data workplace profile table below reflects this example.

    Example reporting structure: Flat organisational structure

    Example 2: More complex organisational structure

    This example shows an organisational structure where:

    • people in different manager categories have the same reporting level to the CEO (for example, there are Senior managers and an Other manager who have a reporting level of -3)
    • a manager category appears at multiple reporting levels to the CEO (for example, some KMPs report directly to the CEO (-1) and others report to those KMPs (-2). 
    2.7 drawing 2 (yellow)

    Key:

    • Bold black text: WGEA-defined manager category
    • Red numbers: reporting level to the CEO 

    The employer’s aggregated data workplace profile table below reflects this example.

    Example reporting structure: More complex organisational structure

    Example 3: Reporting levels to the CEO in corporate structures

    This example shows a corporate structure where a manager reports to someone who is in another entity in the group. In this example, a KMP in the subsidiary reports to the CEO in the parent entity. The KMP’s reporting level needs to reflect their seniority in the hierarchy (organisation chart) of the subsidiary, which is where they work, not the parent. In other words, it’s the relative distance between them and the CEO of the subsidiary. In this example, it is -2.

    2.7 drawing 3 (yellow)

    Key:

    • Bold black text: WGEA-defined manager category
    • Red numbers: reporting level to the CEO

    The employer’s aggregated data workplace profile table below reflects this example.

    Example reporting structure: Reporting levels to the CEO in corporate structures
    Example reporting structure: Reporting levels to the CEO in corporate structures