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Image is a decorative banner which says Guide to Australian standards on gender-inclusive job evaluation

For an objective and fair assessment of jobs, gender bias must be considered during job evaluation. If gender bias is not considered, it is possible that key dimensions of jobs typically performed by women are at risk of being undervalued. This can contributed to the perpetuation of the gender pay gap (International Labour Office, 2008).

Standards Australia  have developed standards for Gender-Inclusive Job Evaluation. To support organisations in adopting the standards, the WGEA has worked with a committee of job evaluation and equity specialists to produce a guide to the Australian Standards on gender-inclusive job evaluation and grading.

Image is decorative and depicts the cover of the guide to the Australian standards for gender inclusive job evaluation
Image is a decorative banner which says Guide to gender pay equity

The guide to pay equity (linked below) provides a step-by-step guidance to: 

  • facilitate an understanding of what is meant by gender pay gaps and the causes of gender pay gaps
  • help you identify and analyse any gender related pay gaps within your organisation, with a focus on like-for-like gender pay gaps
  • establish goals, strategies and actions to manage and  
  • improve gender pay equity in your organisation.

Image is decorative and depicts the cover of the guide to pay equity

Industry segregation

Australia’s workforce remains highly gender segregated

Across the workforce, women and men are concentrated in different industries. Of 19 industries, just eight have at least 40% women and men. Women are concentrated in Health Care and Social Assistance and Education and Training and are least represented in Construction and Mining.

Mining, Transport, Postal and Warehousing, Public Administration and Safety, and Administrative and Support Services are the only four industries where women are not under-represented in management compared to representation across the industry. All other industries, even female-dominated ones, have a lower proportion of women in management compared to women in the workforce. Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing (17.2pp), Financial and Insurance Services (13.7pp), Arts and Recreation Services (13.8pp) and Wholesale Trade (11.6pp) have the biggest gap between representation of women in the workforce and representation of women in management.

2019 Scorecard table 7 - proportion of female employees and management by industry

Where do women and men work?

Women’s workforce participation is concentrated in a few large industries. Health Care and Social Assistance is by far the largest employer of women, followed by Education and Training and Retail Trade.

Men are more evenly spread across the workforce than women, although they have low representation in the highly-feminised
industry of Health Care and Social Assistance.

2019 Scorecard table 8 - gender composition by industry

Workforce composition by gender dominance

Over half of Australian employees work in industries that are dominated by one gender. An organisation or industry is classified as gender mixed if it has at least 40% representation of both women and men.

2019 Scorecard chart 15 - industry segregation