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In 2019, [Un] Equal Pay Day falls on Wednesday 28 August, marking the additional 59 day’s women have to work from the end of the last financial year to earn the same amount as men. [Un]Equal Pay Day is a symbolic indicator of the significance of the national gender pay gap and why it matters for Australian women.

The gender pay gap – while it looks like just a number on a page, it means so much more in reality. Ahead of Equal Pay Day this Wednesday 28 August 2019, it is important that we take a step back and really look at what the gender pay gap means for you, your family, your workplace and Australia.

Last month, the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (‘the Agency’) published a quiz testing the public’s knowledge on the gender pay gap. Since its release, the Agency has received over 500 responses. The average score was 71% - 9.2 out of 13. Around one in five respondents scored within 90%-100%. 

The national gender pay gap remains stable at 14.0%, a drop of just 0.1pp over the last six months. This year, [Un] Equal Pay Day will be on 28 August 2019, marking the 59 additional days from the end of the previous financial year that women must work, on average, to earn the same amount as men earned that year.

This fact sheet provides information about gender imbalances in Australian higher education, including gender segregation in fields of study and pay inequality in industries after graduation and on entering the workplace.

Gender-Inclusive job evaluation

For an objective and fair assessment of jobs, gender bias must be considered during job evaluation. If gender bias is not considered, it is possible that key dimensions of jobs typically performed by women are at risk of being undervalued. This can contributed to the perpetuation of the gender pay gap (International Labour Office, 2008).

Standards Australia  have developed standards for Gender-Inclusive Job Evaluation

To support organisations in adopting the standards, the WGEA has worked with a committee of job evaluation and equity specialists to produce a guide to the Australian Standards on gender-inclusive job evaluation and grading (available below).

Gender bias is pervasive at work and in organisations, creating inequalities at every stage of the employment cycle. This insight paper highlights some of the research examining how gender bias operates at work and provides evidence-based suggestions for creating more equitable recruitment and promotion systems.

US President Harry S Truman once said “if you can’t convince them, confuse them”. And right now, there is confusion out there. Confusion which is fanning an inferno of misinformation about the concept of equal pay and the concept of the gender pay gap. These two notions are very different and it is time to set the record straight.