Economic security

The ‘future of work’ has captured public imagination in recent years as business leaders, policymakers, media pundits and academics debate whether and how work as we know it will continue. This insights paper addresses the future of work debate, considers its shortcomings and reframes the discussion in gendered terms.

Mother’s Day is a day of celebration for families across Australia. It is also an opportunity for us to consider what motherhood means in contemporary society. Many mothers want to pursue careers alongside raising their children and they should not be penalised for doing so.

This section contains all submissions made by the Agency into commission inquiries and reviews. Ranging from submissions on women's retirement and economic security, to the gender pay gap, parental leave and more.  

This WGEA fact sheet provides a quarterly update of the gender workplace statistics.

Ahead of Mother’s Day earlier this month, the Agency’s Director Libby Lyons wrote an OpEd for the Sydney Morning Herald. You can read the full piece in this article.

The impacts of COVID-19 has been widespread and profound, affecting the economy, families and our working lives. Whilst this crisis is still evolving and the long-terms impacts are still unknown, the Agency has published a research paper analysing the impact of COVID-19 through a gendered lens.

The intersection of gender and technology highlights workplace inequities. The under-representation of women in the education, jobs, and sectors that produce technology influences technology design and function. 

Women face greater risk of economic insecurity in retirement than men. To be economically secure in retirement means to be financially secure through a steady income and/or other resources to support a decent standard of living in the foreseeable future.

Friday 8 March 2019 is International Women’s Day. This year’s theme, Balance for Better, is an opportunity to reflect on the areas where balance can better our communities, workplaces and personal lives. Here are some key facts about balance for women and work in Australia.

Australia’s cumulative retirement system means women continue to retire with roughly half the superannuation of men, with the overall gender difference in superannuation balances standing at 38.8%.