For researchers

The ‘future of work’ has captured public imagination in recent years as business leaders, policymakers, media pundits and academics debate whether and how work as we know it will continue. This insights paper addresses the future of work debate, considers its shortcomings and reframes the discussion in gendered terms.

To celebrate and raise awareness of World Youth Skills Day on Sunday 15 July, the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA) is encouraging Australians to reject the idea of ‘girls’ and ‘boys’ subjects in school.

This section contains all submissions made by the Agency into commission inquiries and reviews. Ranging from submissions on women's retirement and economic security, to the gender pay gap, parental leave and more.  

Gender equitable procurement and supply chain strategies involve organisational procurement of goods and services, which are designed to improve gender equality objectives in either the procuring organisation or the supplying organisation.

Health crises can exacerbate existing gender inequalities. As the global health pandemic caused by COVID-19 is ongoing, the impacts and effects are still being assessed and understood. However, preliminary research and emerging data show that women are likely to be affected in particular ways by this global pandemic.

The Business Council of Australia, McKinsey & Company and the Workplace Gender Equality Agency teamed up to undertake a study using three years of WGEA data and more than 40 interviews. The result, Women in Leadership: Lessons from Australian companies leading the way, provides an evidence-based recipe for dismantling barriers to women’s participation at senior levels and a correlation between representation of women in senior roles and the practice of normalising flexible work.

This publication outlines many of the evidence-based benefits of gender equality.

Flexible work is not only good for employees but it also makes sound financial sense, according to new research from the Victorian Government.

University students across the country are heading into a new academic year as the latest graduate labour market statistics confirm that Australian female graduates continue to be paid less across the majority of fields than male graduates.

Infrastructure and property company John Holland recently conducted a pay gap analysis and discovered 15% of their female employees were being paid less than their male colleagues across the business.