Resources

The Agency uses the data that it collects to produce informative resources for the public. The aim of these resources is to provide an indicative measure of the status of gender equality within Australian workplaces.

In addition, the Agency works closely with research partners, researchers and analysts to interpret and analyse the data, forming the foundation for our educational resources on gender equality in the workplace.

 

 

The Agency regularly produces practical tools and guides that can help you implement gender equality strategies in your own workplace.

The Agency produces a range of research papers and fact sheets, that draw on both the data and academic research to investigate both the causes and impacts of gender inequality.

The Agency showcases what real people and organisations are doing to improve gender equality in their own workplaces across Australia.

The Agency has developed an interactive data visualisation resource, which allows users to investigate the entire WGEA dataset. Users can compare data across industries and even organisations.

Resources

The Business Council of Australia, McKinsey & Company and the Workplace Gender Equality Agency teamed up to undertake a study using three years of WGEA data and more than 40 interviews. The result, Women in Leadership: Lessons from Australian companies leading the way, provides an evidence-based recipe for dismantling barriers to women’s participation at senior levels and a correlation between representation of women in senior roles and the practice of normalising flexible work.

This paper explores how workplace negotiation contributes to gender inequality and what organisations and individuals can do to improve outcomes.

Awards and enterprise agreements are common methods of setting pay for organisations. Data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) confirms that gender pay gaps are less prevalent when pay is set by an award or collective agreement. 

This paper explores the different parental leave policies available in OECD countries and offers suggestions for increasing the share of men using parental leave.

Taking action to ensure equal remuneration between women and men is an important step for organisations to proactively manage any associated legal risks. Organisations are required by law to provide equal pay to employees who are performing work of equal or comparable value. 

This paper explores the link between the unequal distribution of caring work between women and men and the unequal labour market outcomes.

A series of profiles of women and men in non-traditional roles, designed to challenge stereotypes about work.

Achieving gender equality, including gender pay equity, is a process that takes time and conscious significant effort. This guide will help you diagnose the status of pay equity in your organisation, set goals, and take practical steps to improve pay equity as part of your gender equality strategy.