Workplace Flexibility

This section contains all submissions made by the Agency into commission inquiries and reviews. Ranging from submissions on women's retirement and economic security, to the gender pay gap, parental leave and more.  

In partnership with the Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), the Agency uncovers new insights about gender pay gaps in Australian workplaces. Every year since 2016, BCEC has produced a report analysing the Agency’s datasets to explore trends and identify policies and practices that work to address gender inequality in the workplace.

Ahead of Mother’s Day earlier this month, the Agency’s Director Libby Lyons wrote an OpEd for the Sydney Morning Herald. You can read the full piece in this article.

Whilst this situation is extraordinary, working from home and flexible working arrangements are not new concepts and, in fact, are key enablers of achieving workplace gender equality. The Agency has developed comprehensive resources to help you plan and implement these arrangements. 

When we talk about men and women balancing work and caring, it can be all too easy to frame the discussion in adversarial absolutes. For instance, when we discuss the gender pay gap and inequality in the workplace and at home, some might take the easy option of saying it is mainly due to men focusing on their careers and not “pulling their weight” at home.

More men are finding themselves caught in the crosshairs between two diverging expectations: traditional breadwinner and modern father.

At Diageo, from 1 July 2019 all Australian employees will be eligible to take 26 weeks paid family leave regardless of gender, carer status or length of service.

Flexible work is good for business and good for employees. The evidence is clear. To celebrate 22 May, Flexible Working Day, the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (‘WGEA’) is asking all organisations to think about how they could become a little ‘flexier’.

The Business Council of Australia, McKinsey & Company and the Workplace Gender Equality Agency teamed up to undertake a study using three years of WGEA data and more than 40 interviews. The result, Women in Leadership: Lessons from Australian companies leading the way, provides an evidence-based recipe for dismantling barriers to women’s participation at senior levels and a correlation between representation of women in senior roles and the practice of normalising flexible work.

The highest paid men in Australia are being paid at least $162,000 more than the highest paid women, but women could be on par with men in most management roles within the next two decades, our latest Gender Equity Insights report shows.