Workplace Flexibility

Ahead of Mother’s Day earlier this month, the Agency’s Director Libby Lyons wrote an OpEd for the Sydney Morning Herald. You can read the full piece in this article.

Whilst this situation is extraordinary, working from home and flexible working arrangements are not new concepts and, in fact, are key enablers of achieving workplace gender equality. The Agency has developed comprehensive resources to help you plan and implement these arrangements. 

When we talk about men and women balancing work and caring, it can be all too easy to frame the discussion in adversarial absolutes. For instance, when we discuss the gender pay gap and inequality in the workplace and at home, some might take the easy option of saying it is mainly due to men focusing on their careers and not “pulling their weight” at home.

More men are finding themselves caught in the crosshairs between two diverging expectations: traditional breadwinner and modern father.

At Diageo, from 1 July 2019 all Australian employees will be eligible to take 26 weeks paid family leave regardless of gender, carer status or length of service.

Flexible work is good for business and good for employees. The evidence is clear. To celebrate 22 May, Flexible Working Day, the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (‘WGEA’) is asking all organisations to think about how they could become a little ‘flexier’.

The highest paid men in Australia are being paid at least $162,000 more than the highest paid women, but women could be on par with men in most management roles within the next two decades, our latest Gender Equity Insights report shows.

The highest paid men in Australia are being paid at least $162,000 more than the highest paid women, but women could be on par with men in most management roles within the next two decades, a new report shows. 

The 2018-19 leading employers understand the importance of parental leave and flexible work as key drivers to lowering the gender pay gap.

The latest WGEA data confirms that when Australian employers take action- the gender pay gap declines. Five years of WGEA data shows that year-on-year employer action to address pay equity has increased and year-on-year the gender pay gap has decreased.