3.4 How do I meet GEI 1?

GEI 1

GEI 1 relates to the gender composition of your workforce. 

Question 1 asks if you have formal policies or strategies to support gender equality in nine different areas. To answer yes, you will have a standalone policy or strategy, or include this item in another policy or strategy. 

Q1.1–1.2: Develop formal recruitment and retention policies and/or strategies

 

Recruitment

Having a formal policy and/or strategy for recruitment means applying gender equality principles when:

  • creating a job description
  • advertising a position
  • sourcing candidates
  • following protocol when using recruitment agencies
  • building and training the recruitment team or panel
  • interviewing candidates and building a shortlist
  • finalising the selection process

Examples

  • creating recruitment campaigns to attract more women to non-traditional roles, like truck driver or engineer 
  • creating campaigns to keep more men in non-traditional areas, like aged care or childcare
  • including at least one female and male interviewer and candidate on your shortlists
  • evaluating job descriptions to make sure they are relevant, non-discriminatory and gender-neutral, and include required skills
  • training internal and external recruitment personnel in equal employment principles and anti-discrimination practices

Retention

Having a formal policy and/or strategy for retention means applying gender equality principles employee engagement strategies, including:

  • remuneration
  • benefits and total rewards
  • training and development
  • health and safety 
  • other employee supports.

Examples

  • auditing employees’ skills to make sure women and men are valued equally
  • offering training and development to all employees
  • providing a keep-in-touch program for employees on parental leave
  • tracking and analysing exits by gender to understand employees’ reasons for staying and leaving

 

Q1.3: Develop formal performance management processes

 

Performance management

Having a formal policy and/or strategy for performance management means applying gender equality principles when enhancing employee productivity, accountability and leadership by: 

  • defining roles, duties and goals 
  • setting key performance indicators (KPIs)
  • holding and recording regular feedback sessions
  • conducting 360-degree performance reviews 
  • creating personal development plans.

Examples

  • analysing performance ratings given to both women and men
  • putting processes in place to make sure performance standards are fair and transparent and there are no systemic reasons why results for women and men differ

Promotions

Having a formal policy and/or strategy for promotions means applying gender equality principles when:

  • setting standards for promotions, like qualifications, work records, success and length of service
  • identifying employees with high potential
  • managing internal applications 
  • offering support during a transition.

Examples

  • advertising all promotion opportunities throughout your organisation and making them accessible to all employees 
  • requiring that managers be trained in promotion, equal employment principles, and transfer and termination policies and procedures
  • considering employees on parental leave for promotions
  • analysing the number of women and men who are promoted

     

    Q1.4–1.5: Use formal processes to identify internal talent and promote employees

     

    Identify internal talent and promote employees

    Having a formal process to identify internal talent and promote employees means applying gender equality principles when:

    • approaching employees with high potential, such as through human resources or their direct manager
    • organising and managing the talent pool, such as through record keeping
    • promoting individuals you have identified.

    Examples

    • auditing your organisation to find high potential female and male employees of all ages who are interested in promotions
    • identifying employees with high potential in non-traditional areas
    • making sure both women and men are represented in the talent pool

     

    1.6–1.7 Use formal processes for succession planning, training and development

     

    Succession planning

    Having a formal process for succession planning means applying gender equality principles to:

    • key roles
    • skill retention strategies, like requiring training
    • succession timetables
    • handover timeframes
    • contingency or risk management.

    Examples

    • considering both women and men in succession planning for key roles
    • aligning your succession planning with diversity and gender equality strategies

    Training and development

    Having a formal process for training and development means applying gender equality principles when:

    • considering the availability and type of training and development programs you offer
    • doing a skills gap analysis
    • documenting the financial resources that can be used for this
    • researching and approving specific training programs
    • identifying specific employee training needs and any work-related improvements from training.

    Examples

    • advertising all training and development opportunities throughout your organisation and making them accessible to all employees
    • analysing the number of women and men using training and development programs, and which type they use
    • assigning both women and men projects in non-traditional areas
    • creating programs for mentoring, sponsorship, and career and leadership development
    • making sure all employees discuss their careers with their managers annually and create a training and development plan

     

    Q1.8–1.9: Set gender equality KPIs for managers

    Question 1.8 asks if you have assigned at least one gender equality KPI to each of your managers. Examples of such KPIs include:

    • increasing gender diversity on recruitment shortlists, project teams and in management programs
    • ensuring gender balance when promoting employees
    • reducing turnover for one gender.

    Question 1.9 then asks if you have an overall gender equality policy or strategy. This means that you outline a framework for employee responsibility and accountability that applies throughout their employment. It can include any or all of the other actions in this section.

    Q.10–1.12: Report on promotions, appointments and resignations

    Questions 1.10 through 1.12 ask you to enter data in a table. Do not leave any cells blank. If a cell does not need data, enter zero. 

    In question 1.10, report on the number of employees you promoted during the reporting period by:

    • gender
    • employment status 
    • manager and non-manager categories. 

    For each category, write the role the employee was promoted to, not from. 

    Promotion:

    • Permanent change
    • When an employee:
      • advances or is raised to a higher office or rank on an ongoing basis or fixed-term contract
      • is promoted from one managerial role to another
      • does not return to their previous role.

    Not a promotion:

    • Temporary change
    • When an employee:
      • transfers to a position of equal rank, even if their duties increase
      • relocates to a higher role in an overseas office
      • is appointed to a higher role but is meant to return to their previous role
      • earns a salary raise.
    • If there are multiple reporting entities in a corporate structure and an employee moves from organisation A to a higher role in organisation B, we consider this a resignation from A and an appointment to B. 
    • Full-equity partners, and non-equity partners who are on partnership terms and agreements (no salary), in professional services organisations that operate as partnership

    In question 1.11, report on the total number of appointments you made during the reporting period by:

    • gender 
    • manager and non-manager categories. 

    Promotions will be counted twice – once in 1.10 and again in 1.11 – because they are also considered internal appointments. Appointments include those made from:

    • recruitment exercises
    • cold canvassing
    • previously submitted resumes
    • internal and external sources. 

    Appointment:

    • If an employee is:
      • appointed to another role in your organisation, by promotion or not 
      • on a fixed-term contract and reappointed to the same role after a new recruitment process for that role
      • employed in multiple roles and receives a contract for each. 
    • If there are multiple reporting entities in a corporate structure and an employee moves from organisation A to a higher role in organisation B, we consider this a resignation from A and an appointment to B.
    • If labour hire organisations, educational institutions and other employers with casual or temporary employee pools:
      • give such employees new contracts
      • placed them at least once during the reporting period.
    • If a group training organisation recruits an employee after they finish their apprenticeship with the organisation.
    • Full-equity partners in professional services organisations that operate as a partnership.

    Not an appointment:

    • If an employee is:
      • absorbed in an acquisition
      • temporarily filling a position and meant to return to their previous position, such as on a secondment.
    • A change to an employee’s status, such as from:
      • part-time to full-time 
      • a contract or casual role to a permanent role.
    • Placing a casual or temporary employee multiple times does not count as separate appointments unless they get another new contract.

    In question 1.12, report on the number of employees who resigned during the reporting period by:

    • gender
    • employment status 
    • manager and non-manager categories.

    This question is meant to help you analyse if more women than men are resigning, which could indicate a non-inclusive culture.

    Resignation:

    • When an employee:
      • gives up their employment voluntarily to move on to another employer 
      • on a fixed-term contract ends their contract earlier than the agreed end date
      • employed in multiple roles resigns from one or more, count each separately.
    • If there are multiple reporting entities in a corporate structure and an employee moves from organisation A to a higher role in organisation B, we consider this a resignation from A and an appointment to B.
    • When an employee in a labour hire organisation, educational institution or other employer with casual or temporary employee pools:
      • gives their employer a resignation notice
      • says they cannot accept any placements.

    Not a resignation:

    • Retirement
    • Employer-initiated terminations or redundancies
    • When full-equity partners, and non-equity partners who are on partnership terms and agreements (no salary), in legal partnership structures leave the organisation